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Inbreeding? Ew!

Updated: 23 hours ago


As you may know, inbreeding dogs is a massive problem – and it is all too common. Inbreeding is when two dogs who are closely related are bred together to make sure certain traits are preserved.


The consequences of inbreeding can be painful. Around “several hundred health disorders related to genetics ... have emerged since dog pure-breeding took off in the 19th century,” according to The New York Times [1]


Because of inbreeding, the majority of bulldogs must be born by caesarean section, due to their abnormally large heads. Pugs often suffer from severe breathing problems due to their flat faces. German Shepherds and other large-breed dogs can suffer from debilitating hip dysplasia. [1]


A 2019 study found that mixed-breed dogs lived over a year longer than purebred dogs. “We’re trading a year of their lives for the ability to choose their shape, size and color.” -The New York Times [1] 


Almost all purebred dogs today are inbred, even if unintentionally, leading to a high rate of genetic disorders.

Choosing to adopt a dog from a shelter helps fight inbreeding because it lowers the demand for purebred dogs, who have been bred in ways that cause health problems. Shelter dogs are usually mixed breeds, so they are less likely to have genetic disorders.


And of course, by adopting from a shelter, you give a home to a dog in need!


Hundreds of thousands of dogs are put to death in U.S. shelters every year, and many more will spend their lives in cages, desperately in need of a loving home and a family. 


Our mission is to end the number 1 cause of suffering and death for dogs and cats -- overpopulation -- by developing a permanent-lasting birth control cookie that will only need to be eaten one time, and it will in effect spay or neuter -- without surgery.


Join the Pack: For less than the cost of a cup of coffee, you can join our mission to end the number 1 cause of suffering facing dogs and cats with just $5 a month.



Thanks so much for caring about animals!


 

 

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